Upgrading SSIS projects, part I

In the previous post, I wrote about migrating SSISDB database. When we migrate the database the packages still have the version of the source SSIS catalog. When you start the execution of the migrated package, you get the information like “The package was migrated from version 6 to version 8. It must be saved to retain migration changes.” This information is written to the log no matter which logging level we choose (also with None). The question is: will it blend should we upgrade the packages (or better – the projects)? And if the answer is ‘yes’ – why should we do it and what are the options? Should we

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T-SQL Tuesday #96: Folks Who Have Made a Difference

This post is a part of T-SQL Tuesday series started by Adam Machanic in 2009. Ewald Cress (b | t) asked to give a shout-out to people (well-known or otherwise) who have made a meaningful contribution to your life in the world of data. As I was thinking about the people that had the most impact on my career I have to give the biggest kudos to my friend, Leszek Kwaśniewski (t). About six years ago I attended the SQL Server courses about T-SQL programming and database administration where Leszek was one of the trainers. During one of the breaks, he told about user group meetings about SQL Server and

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So, you want to migrate SSIS(DB)?

Excellent! I wanted to, and after few trials and errors I finally did! And it’s pretty easy (as with all things you know when you learn it). For a start I will warn you a bit – SSISDB isn’t the database you just backup on one server and restore on another. There are some more steps to do. The same procedure will work for migrations from version 2012 to 2017 or 2016 to 2017, I didn’t check (yet) 2014 to 2017. I also tested the migration of 2012 to 2016 version but had some problems with this when it came to upgrading database part. Will investigate it later (probably some

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Learning something new: getting information from SSIS packages with PowerShell

In the series of learning something new, I started with analysing of the SSIS package XML. I know what I want to extract, so let the fun begin. I will use Powershell to get the data from the .dtsx files and save it to the database. The whole script is presented below with comments. For more information scroll down. #I will use Out-DbaDataTable and Write-DbaDataTable from dbatools, so import it Import-Module dbatools   # find recursively all Executable nodes in .dtsx file function Find-Executables($fileName, $executable) { foreach($item in $executable) { # are we there, yet? (if no – recursion) if($item.Executables) { Find-Executables $fileName $item.Executables.Executable }   # if yes –

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Connect to SQL Server on Ubuntu Linux VirtualBox machine

For my everyday tests with SQL Server I use VirtualBox. SQL Server 2017 is/will be a huge thing – mostly because it will be available on Linux. If so – I should get comfortable with using it on Linux. I start with Ubuntu Server (because of the name – I used Ubuntu Desktop in the past), Installation of VM on VirtualBox comes down to adding ISO image as the CD-ROM (DVD-ROM?) and selecting almost only the default options. I don’t want to build a cluster or do sophisticated things – I just want the Linux Server to be up and running.

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Get the passwords from SSIS Environment variables

SSIS has a neat feature – it encodes all the sensitive data when you set it as – well – sensitive. It’s a great thing for environment variables – you write once, use it to configure the project and then you can forget the password. Or write it down for later use. In the future. Some day. Maybe. But what if you need to do the configuration on another server? Or you’re just curious how to decode encrypted data? SSIS has to do it somehow, right?

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What happens during SSIS deployments?

When you deploy SSIS project basically you have two options – right click on project name and standalone tool (let’s skip SMO and stuff). Both mean the same: IsDeploymentWizard.exe. I was curious what happens during deployment and why mode/Silent finishes deployment very quickly, so I started digging.

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